Rosemary Focaccia

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!I frequently mention curling here on the blog.  Both Laura and I have been curling for years, and we love it.  Not only is curling a fun way to work out, but it’s a great social sport, too.  After games, it’s customary to grab a drink and take a seat at the table with your team and the team you played against.  Over the years, this social side has led to some pretty hilarious conversations.  Case in point: the Berenst#in Bears problem.

We all remember the Berenstain Bears, right?  Papa Bear and Mama Bear.  Brother Bear and Sister Bear.  I remember reading these books again and again as a kid.  And I also remember them being the Berenstein Bears…not the Berenstain Bears.

Apparently I’m not the only one who remembers this.  The internet (in it’s full glory) has developed a theory that it really was Berenstein Bears with an “e.”  Sometime in the mid-1990’s, time and space switched into an ‘alternate timeline.”  In short, a parallel universe exists where it really was the Berenstein Bears.  We lived in that universe as kids, but then it switched over to the current universe.  Say what!?

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!There is even a name for this whole phenomenon: The Mandela Effect.  Apparently a lot of folks remember Nelson Mandela dying in prison in the 1980’s.  However, he was released from prison in 1990 and passed away in 2013.  Well that sure is difficult to explain, huh?  The Mandela Effect refers to a collective belief where shared false memories are actually an insight into parallel universes.  In other words, Mandela really did die in prison in the 1980’s, but then we switched over to an alternate universe where he lived until 2013.  Woah.  That’s deep.  They might be onto something, though.  I swear it was the Berenstein Bears.  Where did that “a” come from!?

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!Rosemary Focaccia

Time-traveling bears aside, let’s turn our attention to something we can all agree on: bread is delicious.  Homemade bread is even more delicious.  Baking homemade bread truly is one of my favorite kitchen activities, and it’s been quite some time since I posted a bread recipe here on the blog.  The wait is over.  This Rosemary Focaccia is insanely delicious!

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!Over the years, I’ve shared several different variations on focaccia bread.  Focaccia is a flat bread with Italian roots, and it’s quite versatile.  It can be served as an appetizer or side dish.  It can be split and used as sandwich bread.  Or my favorite way which is simply shoving it straight into my face.

This Rosemary Focaccia is about as classic as you can get when it comes to focaccia.  It relies on a generous amount of olive oil for both texture and flavor, but I also snuck a bit of milk in there as milk leads to a more tender bread.  The result is a Rosemary Focaccia (or focaccia al rosmarino) with a wonderfully flaky crust and a soft, pillow-y interior.  I ate quite a bit of this bread while I was taking the photos.  Like half the pan.  It really is that tasty.  Enjoy!

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!Did you make this Rosemary Focaccia at home?  Leave a comment.  Or snap a photo and tag me on Instagram (@Spicedblog)!

Looking for more homemade bread recipes?  Check out these other favorites:

Cheesy Spinach and Sundried Tomato Focaccia (excellent on the side of soup or chili!)
Goat Cheese and Tomato Focaccia
Italian Prosciutto Panini
Homemade Italian Bread
Parmesan Cheese Rolls

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!

Rosemary Focaccia

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!
5 from 8 votes
Print Pin Rate
Prep Time: 2 hours 25 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 45 minutes
Servings: 24 squares
Calories: 158kcal

Ingredients

  • 5 cups all-purpose flour
  • tsp table salt
  • tsp active dry yeast This is equivalent to one packet of yeast.
  • 2 tsp Italian seasonings
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • cups warm water
  • ½ cup warm milk can substitute with more water
  • ¾ cup olive oil divided
  • 2 tsp flaked sea salt or kosher salt
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary

Instructions

  • Using a countertop mixer, add flour, table salt, yeast, Italian seasonings and sugar; stir until well combined.
  • Add warm water, warm milk and ½ cup of olive oil; mix on low speed until well combined.
  • Increase speed to medium and mix for 5-6 minutes. (Note: If dough is sticky, just add an additional tablespoon of flour.)
  • Transfer dough into a large, oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm location until dough has doubled in size (~75-90 minutes). (Tip: I let dough rise in my oven with the oven light off. Just make sure to remove the dough before you turn the oven on!)
  • Using a standard rimmed baking sheet, brush the remaining ¼ cup of olive oil evenly onto surface.
  • Turn dough out of bowl onto baking sheet. Turn dough over several times so that it is well coated with olive oil.
  • Gently press/push dough until it fits evenly into pan. Using the tips of your fingers, press into dough until you touch the bottom of the pan. (Note: You don’t want to make actual holes in the dough. Instead, you’re looking to make several dozen indentions in the dough.)
  • Cover pan with plastic wrap and place in a warm location for 1 hour.
  • Preheat oven to 425°F. (If letting the dough rise in the oven, make sure to remove it first!)
  • Sprinkle top of dough with kosher salt and chopped rosemary.
  • Bake for 18-20 minutes, or until focaccia is golden brown.
  • Let cool for at least 10 minutes before slicing.

This Rosemary Focaccia is a classic Italian-style bread.  The generous amount of olive oil leads to a wonderfully golden and flaky crust on this bread.  Yum!

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20 Comments

    1. Rosemary and focaccia are just a classic flavor combo! I love how easy focaccia is to make…and you really can play with the flavors to create some fun versions. Cheers, Alexandra!

    1. Yeah, I’m with you, Kathy! As we were having this discussion in the curling club, I was sitting there with this dumbfounded look on my face the whole time. Haha! Either way, a good focaccia bread is hard to beat…and this is a good one for sure! 🙂

  1. 5 stars
    Nelson Mandela dying in the 80s is news to me but the Beresntain Bears 100 percent spelled their name with an e back then. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT! As someone with a name no one ever spells right I’ve always been sensitive to the way others spell their names–I would know if there was an a in there! The alternate universe theory isn’t so crazy to me. OK, rant over. I need some carbs. This focaccia looks pretty amazing!

    1. Yes! See, I told you. There is some huge conspiracy theory going on here. It’s Berenstein Bears, darn it all! 🙂 Also, carbs. Focaccia. Rosemary. Together. Delicious. Thanks, Kelsie! (Or is it Kelsey? Hmmm….)

  2. 5 stars
    David, I could have sworn it was an e as well! My daughter’s always pointing out the Mandela effect to me. It’s crazy! And so confusing!

    Not many things as satisfying as a good piece of homemade bread, and your rosemary focaccia looks amazing! I’d have eaten half the pan, too!

    1. So you’ve heard of the Mandela effect, too? I was sitting there at that table just going “holy cow, this is deep stuff!” But, yes, it’s definitely Berenstein Bears. I don’t know where this Berenstain thing came from! 🙂

      Also, rosemary focaccia is apparently one of my weaknesses. Haha! Actually, this isn’t a surprise at all. I love all forms of homemade bread. Thanks, Kelly!

  3. 5 stars
    I love focaccia, David! And rosemary seems to be a great addition, especially since my rosemary bushes are a little out of hand, right now! I’ve used your focaccia recipe before (from maybe a year ago? Idk) and it was awesome! So I can’t wait to put some rosemary on it!

    1. Perfect! Chop some of that rosemary and use it for this focaccia! I’m not sure which version you made before, but this one is a bit more traditional. There’s another focaccia recipe I have out here that uses shredded cheese in it. Not traditional, but HOLY COW is that one delicious! 🙂 Now I’m thinking about making a rosemary version of that one with shredded mozzarella in the dough. That would be quite tasty! Thanks, Laura!

  4. 5 stars
    You’re freaking me out with that whole Mandela Effect. I’m not familiar with the concept, but who knows… Did you ever see that move, ‘Sliding Doors’?

    I could eat so much of this Rosemary Focaccia – the texture looks fantastic! A big slab of it and a salad and I’m one happy eater!

    1. You know, I think I meant to watch Sliding Doors, but then I got distracted and never came back to it. I’ll have to check it out. The Mandela Effect is definitely creepy. I mean I’d swear that Berenstein Bears had an ‘e’ instead of an ‘a’…and thousands of other people agree!

      Leaving the deep philosophical stuff aside, this focaccia is amazing! It does indeed pair well with salads. We also sliced some in half and topped it with prosciutto for an easy sandwich. Yum!! Thanks, Marissa!

  5. 5 stars
    Yup, I know your love for curling. Indeed, I started to pay attention to curling clubs in Canada just because of you. I also believe I have somewhere a couple of pictures where I captured lovely (or peculiar) culrling club’s buildings, but I’ve never shown them to you, I guess.
    Anyway, what could be better than a warm freshly baked focaccia with rosemary and sea salt in summer? Give me some tomatoes (And maybe some wine) along with it, and I’ll be a happy man!

    1. You need to share those photos of curling clubs, Ben! To be fair, most curling clubs that I’ve seen aren’t particularly attractive. They’re just cinder block buildings. It’s inside where the magic happens! You and Andrey should go try curling at a local club. (I’m serious!!)

      Now you’re talking with a glass of wine, fresh tomatoes and some of this focaccia! That actually sounds like an awesome summer lunch or dinner on the back deck. Thanks for the idea!

  6. 5 stars
    I had to stop reading and check google, I always loved reading the Berenstain Bears, how did I not realise it was an ‘a’ not an ‘e’! Anyway, love focaccia, especially if you split a slice in half and fill with some Italian cold cuts or better make a full muffuletta!

    1. That’s my point exactly, Matt! I think it was an ‘e’ not an ‘a’. It’s all a giant Mandela effect! 🙂

      At least we can all agree that focaccia bread is amazing. And now you’ve got me craving a good muffaletta…oh man, that’s gonna have to happen with some of this focaccia! Yum!

  7. I must agree with you David that one of my favourite ways of eating Focaccia is also to shove it in my face! Ha ha! Lynne and I love a Focaccia to dip into olive oil and balsamic vinegar as a “snack” bread when we’re watching something good on the TV. I’ll have to give your version adding in the milk a try.

    1. I find adding milk is a nice touch with focaccia (and most breads) as it softens it up a bit. I’m with ya on the focaccia, Neil. I love a good homemade bread, but focaccia holds a special place for me. Yum!

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